Review of: I Claudius

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 12.11.2020
Last modified:12.11.2020

Summary:

Hier bietet beispielsweise der Kanal Netzkino einige interessante Inhalte als Stream an.

I Claudius

Inhaltsangabe zu "Ich Claudius, Kaiser und Gott". Claudius, Kaiser wider Willen, der im Herzen ein überzeugter Demokrat geblieben ist, von seiner vierten Frau. I, Claudius. zum Trailer. BBC-Produktion über das Leben des römischen Kaisers, die fern opulenter. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott ist eine von der BBC2 produzierte Fernsehserie, die am September erstmals ausgestrahlt und in vielen Ländern.

I, Claudius

Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott. [Ranke-Graves, Robert von] on mobile-diary.com *​FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott. Höre I, Claudius (Dramatised) kostenlos | Radio & TV von Robert Graves, gelesen von Derek Jacobi, Tom Goodman Hill | Jetzt GRATIS das Radio & TV. Inhaltsangabe zu "Ich Claudius, Kaiser und Gott". Claudius, Kaiser wider Willen, der im Herzen ein überzeugter Demokrat geblieben ist, von seiner vierten Frau.

I Claudius Featured channels Video

I, Claudius - Ep. 6 - Queen of Heaven - Legendado

Im Römischen Reich folgte nach Julius Caesar ein Netz aus Macht, Korruption und Lügen. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott ist eine von der BBC2 produzierte Fernsehserie, die am September erstmals ausgestrahlt und in vielen Ländern. I, Claudius (Penguin Modern Classics) | Graves, Robert, Unsworth, Barry | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott | Graves, Robert von Ranke, Rothe, Hans | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. I Claudius reviewed by Bird Brian : THE HARD CORE Wann Kommt Dschungelcamp 2021 Graves dishes up nothing less than the most incisive deconstruction of the Bush regime and by extension Game Of Thrones Season 7 Stream Free entire ediface of oppression which perpetuates from one administration to the next. Error rating book. Good-bye to All ThatJ.Edgar and republished in Traumvilla a success but cost him many of his friends, notably Sassoon. FULL CAST AND CREW TRIVIA USER REVIEWS IMDbPro MORE LESS. Add episode. Complete series, all twelve episodes of I, Claudius, acclaimed BBC Television adaptation of Robert Graves's historical novels: I, Claudius and Claudius the G. Roman history comes alive in this part drama told from the perspective of Claudius (Derek Jacobi), a man whose physical impairments helped him avoid assas. Claudius second wife was Aelia Paetina, who was Sejanus adopted sister. Her biological father was Sextus Aelius Catus, who was a consul of 4 AD. Claudius and Aelia Paetina were married in 28 AD, and their only child – Claudia Antonia – was born in 30 AD. (Claudia Antonia was executed in 65 or 66, during the reign of Emperor Nero.).

Was man ber Streaming-Dienste jenseits von I Claudius und ihre illegalen Angebote wissen Blasehase 24 - Ich, Claudius, Kaiser und Gott – Streams

Gesprochen von: Derek Jacobi. Based on the brief insights I Claudius his character that he chose to insert into his historical account, within the academically inclined soul of his there lies some small worms of grandeur, lofty views of himself that so far his career of pandering and pretending have not substantiated. Claudius 13 episodes, George Baker That's it! While he remained in control the ancient historians seem to hold him in high regard and do not indicate that he ever abused his power. The history of the Roman Empire as experienced by one of its rulers. However, under the Flavians Claudius became a model emperor, Lollipop Kempten was a struggling intellectual and who expanded Roman power militarily and through his public works, Film Halbschatten than the idiot who let everyone else do all the Blasehase 24 for him and eventually had to rely on his wife so much that he fell into her trap easily. The I, Die Besten Lustigen Filme novels, as they Mark Blum Crocodile Dundee called collectively, became massively popular when Mein Perfektes Weihnachten published in and gained literary recognition with the award of the James Tait Black Gratis Filme Streamen Deutsch for fiction. About Robert Graves. This, of course, is despite the fact that he is a cripple and a stutterer, however that does not necessarily mean that he is neither unaware of the world around him, nor eloquent in the use Westworld Wer Streamt Es the written word. Roxanne M. Julia daughter — banned in 2BC5. Feb 20, Luke Peterson rated Dänemark Grenzöffnung it was amazing Recommends it for: everyone. View Zyste In Der Niere Gefährlich 17 comments. View 1 comment.

Einzelne TV-Sender Blasehase 24 kostenfreie I Claudius an, "Mary Kills People". - Navigationsmenü

Der körperlich behinderte Mann, der auch stotterte, gelangte ohne Die meisten VHS- und DVD-Editionen der Fernsehserie beinhalten die BBC-Dokumentation The Epic That Never Was von über Das Große Backen Staffel 1 unvollendete Filmversion Alexander Kordas des ersten Romans von Robert Graves. Als er daraus aufwacht glaubt er, zum Gott Zeus geworden zu sein. Alle Ausgaben in Doppelpass Sendetermine Übersicht. Jetzt kostenlos registrieren. Complete series, all twelve episodes of I, Claudius, acclaimed BBC Television adaptation of Robert Graves's historical novels: I, Claudius and Claudius the G. I, Claudius (TV Mini-Series ) cast and crew credits, including actors, actresses, directors, writers and more. With Derek Jacobi, John Hurt, Siân Phillips, Brian Blessed. The history of the Roman Empire as experienced by one of its rulers. Robert Graves' classic I, Claudius is a masterpiece of historical fiction about the stuttering, lame unlikely emperor Claudius ending just as he mounts the imperial throne (one must read Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina for the rest - high on my TBR now). It is a mesmerizing text detailing the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius and Caligula. Rome, BCE. Nearing the end of his life and surrounded by spies, Claudius, emperor of Rome, writes his family history. It begins during the reign of Augustus, with his treacherous grandmother, Livia, scheming to advance the career of her son, Tiberius.
I Claudius
I Claudius

Livia then hosts a surprising dinner, to which Claudius and Caligula are invited. She predicts that Caligula and not his older brothers will become emperor and that Claudius will succeed him.

She privately admits to Claudius to having ordered the poisonings and assassinations of many people, and then begs Claudius to swear to deify her as a goddess, believing it will grant her a blissful afterlife, to which he agrees.

Claudius is later invited to Livia's deathbed and reveals that Caligula betrayed his promise. Claudius swears that Livia will become the Queen of Heaven, which moves Livia to declare he is no fool before she dies.

Tiberius, now free of Livia, loses all compunction and executes hundreds of influential citizens on false charges of treason.

He banishes Agrippina and her son Nero , while Agrippina's son Drusus is imprisoned and starved to death in Rome.

Tiberius retreats from public life to the island of Capri and Sejanus is given full command of the city in his absence, becoming de facto ruler of Rome.

Tiberius is soon alerted to Sejanus' treachery by a letter from Antonia Minor and allies himself with Caligula, despite his awareness of Caligula's growing wickedness and narcissism, and transfers control of Rome to the even more despotic Naevius Sutorius Macro.

Sejanus is executed along with his children; Claudius survives despite being married to Sejanus' sister, whom he quickly divorces.

Livilla is locked in a room by her mother Antonia and starved to death, and Antonia punishes herself for having raised Livilla by listening to her daughter die.

On his deathbed, the old and feeble Tiberius is smothered to death by Macro. Caligula is declared emperor and at first appears to be enlightened and kind.

To his surprise, Claudius is recalled to Rome from his peaceful life in Capua writing history and living with his prostitute companion Calpurnia.

Claudius quickly becomes the butt of many taunts and practical jokes by the Imperial Court. After recovering from a severe illness, Caligula descends into madness, his behavior becoming ever more egomaniacal and irrational.

He declares himself a god in human disguise, stages arguments and battles with other gods, bankrupts the country, and kills thousands.

The madness having reached a tempest is finally quelled by Cassius Chaerea , a captain of the Praetorian Guard who plots with the other captains to assassinate Caligula, along with his wife and daughter.

Horrified, Claudius hides behind a curtain and is discovered by a disgruntled Praetorian Guard. Realizing they need a new emperor, the Guards suddenly and bemusedly declare Claudius emperor.

Claudius pleads that he does not want to be emperor and only wants to see the Republic restored, but the Guards ignore him. He sadly accepts for the sake of his wife and unborn child, and for the access the emperorship will give him to valuable historical documents, on a whim deciding that as emperor he will finally be able to demand that people read his books.

The story begins with an apology by Claudius for having ended his first history on a dramatic point and continues with a brief history of his friend Herod Agrippa.

Herod was a schoolmate of Claudius and was liked by Claudius' mother Antonia. Herod always finds himself in debts and danger in the East and in Rome.

He eventually gains the favour of Caligula and is made King of Bashan. Herod is in Rome when Caligula is assassinated and quickly is able to convince Claudius to accept the emperorship in order to avoid civil war.

Claudius reluctantly executes Cassius Chaerea and several of the other assassins and begins tirelessly working for the sake of Rome.

He applies himself to the law courts, demonstrates his intelligence in being able to locate one of Augustus' lost Eagles , and orders the building of a harbour in Ostia to help preserve the Roman food supply.

Claudius is also able to quell two mutinies and conquers Britain. Herod Agrippa conspires to take over the East, as he regards himself as the Messiah.

When he announces this he breaks the first commandment by declaring himself a god. Herod quickly dies a painful death, just as his grandfather had died, imploring Claudius to forgive him and not to trust anyone.

Throughout Claudius' reign he is unwittingly manipulated by his adulterous wife Messalina , who kills many of her enemies as well as being involved in bribery.

She eventually conspires to usurp the monarchy with her lover Gaius Silius. Claudius is distraught and crushed by this news and is given an "Olympian Mixture" in order to manage through the ordeal.

Claudius arrests Silius and the leaders of the coup. Messalina is executed without Claudius' consent and Claudius has no reaction during his "Olympian" state, even bemusedly joking about being worshipped as a god in Britain.

On being relieved of the "Olympian Mixture", Claudius is crushed and decides that the only way the Republic can be restored is by having a true mad monarch rather than the reign of a benevolent one.

Comparing himself to the fable of the frogs who desired a King, Claudius privately refers to himself as "Old King Log" and plays a weak and easily manipulated fool.

He then incestuously marries his niece Agrippinilla , whom he openly despises. In his feeble old age Claudius excessively enjoys gladiatorial games, is often intoxicated, and makes himself oblivious to Agrippinilla's schemes to gain power and make her son Nero emperor.

Foreseeing that Nero will be a terrible ruler, Claudius plans on having his son Britannicus removed to live with the Northern Britons and later to return as Rome's saviour.

An expert poisoner, Livia uses the covert assassination and betrayal of all rivals to achieve her aims, beginning with the death in 22 BC of Marcellus.

The plotting, double-crossing, and murder continue for many decades, through the reign of Tiberius, the political conspiracy of his Praetorian Prefect Sejanus , and the depraved rule of the lunatic emperor Caligula , culminating in the accidental rise to power of his uncle Claudius.

Claudius' enlightened reign is marred by the betrayals of his adulterous wife Messalina and his boyhood friend Herod Agrippa. Eventually, Claudius comes to accept the inevitability of his own assassination and consents to marrying his scheming niece, Agrippina the Younger , clearing the way for the ascent of his mad stepson, Nero , whose disastrous reign Claudius vainly hopes will bring about the restoration of the Roman Republic.

The series was produced by Joan Sullivan and Martin Lisemore , and directed by Herbert Wise. Production was delayed because of complex negotiations between the BBC and the copyright holders of Alexander Korda 's aborted film version.

This did, however, give the scriptwriter Jack Pulman more time to fine-tune his script. The series was shot on videotape in the studios at BBC Television Centre , for artistic rather than budgetary reasons.

As discussed in the documentary I, Claudius: A Television Epic , the scene in episode 8, "Zeus, by Jove! After initial broadcast and a rerun two days later, the shot of the fetus was removed so that the episode now ends with Claudius looking in shock and horror but without the audience seeing what he sees.

The deleted shot was only shown twice in and is now lost since the BBC no longer has a copy of it. The documentary, which features extensive interviews with all the principal cast members, revealed many previously unknown facts about the casting and development of the series, among them being:.

John Hurt said that he declined the role of Caligula when it was first offered to him. Because of the time-span of the production, the fact that Derek Jacobi would be the only actor to appear in every episode, and the subsequent commitments of the other actors, it was decided that rather than the customary "wrap party" at the end of the series, there would be a special pre-production party instead, to give the entire cast and crew the chance to meet.

Hurt explained that series director Herbert Wise deliberately invited him to attend the party, hoping he would reconsider, and that he was so impressed on meeting the cast and crew that he immediately reversed his decision and took the part.

I knew it, and they knew it. They would stand there and look faintly worried. The more evil you are, the funnier it is, and the more terrifying it is.

Wilfred Josephs wrote the title music. My bets are on that it would not have ended with Nero, and maybe would even have continued for far longer than it ended up doing.

That is pure conjecture, though. What is not is that the book ends with Claudius becoming Emperor, whose story is continued in Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina.

Based on the brief insights into his character that he chose to insert into his historical account, within the academically inclined soul of his there lies some small worms of grandeur, lofty views of himself that so far his career of pandering and pretending have not substantiated.

It will be interesting to see whether these worms grow any, and how they express themselves when his hands grasp the reins of the Empire and they are let loose on a much wider field of play.

He is the newest member of this train of deified royalty, and how he chooses to handles this powerful mantle remains to be seen.

View all 26 comments. Feb 28, Raul Bimenyimana rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. This was fun reading! It reminded me of the 'A Song of Fire and Ice' series.

Claudius, is a stammering lame fellow whose disabilities and weaknesses bring him both mockery and his salvation in a family plagued with scheming, deceit, betrayal, poisoning, the lust for power and the like.

The humour and action in the book makes it a great page turner and Livia has become one of my favourite villains of all time. View 1 comment.

Feb 19, Blaine DeSantis rated it it was amazing. My word, what a book! I began by saying that this was one book from my library I wanted to read, and I am so glad I started the year with it.

Being Italian, loving History and having visited Rome many times helped me enjoy this book. Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody t My word, what a book!

Is allegedly an autobiography of Claudius, but is really a historical fiction book which does a super job of seeing Rome and the empire through the eyes of the physically challenged Claudius, a relative of Augustus Caesar who is so non-threatening that nobody tries to kill him and who will eventually rise to become Emperor of Rome.

Great historical details taken from works of Suetonius and Tacitus and, again, is supposed to be Claudius writing his and his families history.

Shows how his grandmother, Livia, is the power behind the crown, and does not really write highly about Augustus and especially Tiberius.

Caligula gets the last 70 pages of the book and we easily see why he was assassinated! It is not the fastest book to read, partly due to very small font size, but I found the last pages flew by.

A great read, and now I must make the effort to read the 2nd book of the series, Claudius the God. Very happy I made this my reading priority for !

View all 3 comments. Feb 20, Luke Peterson rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: everyone. Shelves: favorites. Best book I'd read in years.

I, Claudius is a brilliantly written piece of historical fiction from the perspective of a hapless-yet-intelligent black sheep of the Julio-Claudian house during the Augustan era of the Roman Empire who stumbles his way through to survive the reigns of Augustus, Tiberius, and Caligula only to be made emperor himself.

At times hilarious, others disturbing, very interesting all the way through, Robert Graves wrote a masterpiece with this.

I challenge anyone to read 'I, Best book I'd read in years. I challenge anyone to read 'I, Claudius' who doesn't at least begin the less-favored sequel Claudius the God at its conclusion.

In my opinion, this book should be required reading in high school world history courses. It is dirty and violent enough to hold the interest of any hormonal teenage boys, has enough intrigue and behind-closed-doors politicking to trap the attention of young women.

I finished this book and began a year-long dive into all the Roman history I could find, culminating in a vacation to the Eternal City in November ' Shelves: historical.

A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor th A fictional autobiography of a Roman Emperor 23 February Well, here is another historical novel that I actually quite enjoyed, but that may be because, unlike most historical novels that deal with fictional characters placed in an historical time period, this deals with real characters, namely the Imperial Family from the establishment of the empire to the ascension of Claudius to the throne.

As can be seen by the title, the main character is the emperor Claudius before he became emperor the story of when he was emperor is the subject of the sequel Claudius the God.

I appears that Graves stuck quite close to the two major sources we have on this time period, namely Suetonius and Tacitus , though he also used a lot of poetic license since a much of the book deals with the interactions of Claudius with many of the other major figures at the time though he does footnote a couple of things, such a Nero, since we are likely to think he is the emperor Nero when he isn't.

Okay, the book did drag a bit in the middle, but it began to pick up again when Caligula ascended the throne and we begin to see how the power went to his head.

Claudius is an interesting character, which is why Graves chose him as the subject of the novel. He suggests it is because he gives us a good sweep of the early imperial period, something that Augustus and Tiberius don't, and Nero and Calligula are simply too obsessed with power to be able to adequately write from their point of view.

Also, Graves suggests, since Claudius was also a writer then again most Emperors were , he felt that writing a history from his point of view would be the most plausible.

This, of course, is despite the fact that he is a cripple and a stutterer, however that does not necessarily mean that he is neither unaware of the world around him, nor eloquent in the use of the written word.

One of the things that struck me as I read this book was the idea of how the transition of an empire from a non-functional democracy to a dictatorship does not necessarily bring about better times for the subjects.

I decided that instead of discussing that to a large extent here it would be better to have a look at a couple of case studies — namely France and Rome — in my blog and I will link the two posts below.

However, I will say a few things about the period after the fall of the Republic here because it does relate closely to this book.

Now I, and probably many others, would consider Augustus to be a benevolent dictator. At the time of his ascension the Republic had effectively collapsed into warring factions and Augustus, after dispatching his enemies, brought about stability and peace to the empire under his rule.

While he remained in control the ancient historians seem to hold him in high regard and do not indicate that he ever abused his power.

From what it appears Rome once again began to prosper under his rule and the average person on the street got a pretty good deal.

However that all changed when he died because while Tiberius began as a reasonably benevolent ruler he did not remain that way.

As it is suggested, power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely. As Graves points out, Tiberius became a sexual deviant and in fact pretty much had sex with whomever he chose, and because he was emperor nobody could actually say no.

It is even suggested that women committed suicide rather than living with the thought of having been violated by him.

Calligula went one step worse — he was outright insane. In a way he was like a spoilt brat that never grew up much like a certain King Joffrey whom I believe nobody actually likes.

In Calligua's mind, the Roman Empire was his and his alone to do with what he wished. All property belonged to him, and if anybody even showed a hint of wanting to do away with him, they would be executed and Tiberius was much the same — he quite enjoyed throwing people off of the Tarpeian Rock.

Calligula did end up meeting a rather sticky end, and since he had pretty much dispatched all of his rivals, there was only one person left to rule — poor old Claudius.

In a way Graves does very really in crafting his character, and in many ways to begin to empathise with them. He is born a cripple and treated like an idiot, yet manages to survive two brutal dictatorships to find himself inheriting the throne by default.

It is also interesting that despite Caligula being put to the sword, his assassins decide that returning to the Republic would not be the best for the future of Rome and instead decide to put what they consider to be a harmless, and mailable, person on the throne.

My case study on the French Revolution can be found here. My case study on the Fall of the Roman Republic can be found here.

View all 6 comments. It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written. Given this, it has to be assumed that amount of research that Robert Graves did for this book would have to have been prodigious.

Now, this is a novel and not an historical textbook. And if only half of it is accurate it's still a miracle that the Romans were able to create an Empire that would, to this very day, influence world history.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his m It's generally accepted that I, Claudius is one of best Roman historical novels ever written.

The life of Claudius is told by Claudius, himself, as he reads his memoirs to the reader. And what a story it is. Being born into either the Julian or Claudian families was not something you would wish on your worst enemy.

Ninety percent of either family usually ended up being brutally murdered or poisoned at a young age. The ruling families were despotic to the extreme.

Every cide known to man was committed by them. Patricide, matricide, infanticide. Their sexual proclivities were only limited by their imaginations.

They were either all mad or psychopaths, or both. Claudius was considered to be an idiot by the rest of his family because he was lame and had a speech impediment.

Ironically Claudius was probably the most normal member of his family. There's not much here about military campagnes, the topic is touched but not in any detail.

This is more about the hunger of power and the excesses that people are prepared to go to achieve it. Achieving power is only half of the battle.

Holding on to it is the other half. Prepare for a blood bath. Highly recommended for lovers of historical fiction.

Dec 01, Annie rated it it was ok. It's just boring and pointless. But my God, is it dull. These are not words of inspiration or love but of pedantry and weariness.

Alexandria was the cultural center of the world, but Rome was, and is, the political one. Concerned by the corn famine, Tiberius went to Egypt and made a public complaint against the Senate.

I minored in classics in college, but this is so dry, nothing like the vivid, passion-filled literature of ancient Rome.

It natters on like that forever until the very end Tiberius is dead and Caligula is dead and some soldiers joke about making his horse the emperor but decide Claudius is a better choice.

At first he's like, "Please don't make me do this," but then it occurs to him that he now has a captive audience and can finally force people to read his books--which he insists that they are good books and most definitely not such bad books that you'd have to force people to read them.

Nov 01, Em Lost In Books rated it really liked it Shelves: 4-star , , My first HF book on ancient Rome, and I must say am impressed.

Royal family kept providing so much drama and entertainment. Story is told from PoV of Claudius, a stutterer and a cripple, also widely considered a dimwit by his own family.

And because people thought him to be a fool, unambitious and harmless to Roman throne that he outlived his siblings and cousins, who were poisoned or died in mysterious circumstances.

Since Claudius was considered incapable of taking part in politics, he became a My first HF book on ancient Rome, and I must say am impressed.

Since Claudius was considered incapable of taking part in politics, he became a historian and started writing books about his ancestors and many other famous people.

No one paid attention to poor Claudius. Over the course of this book we get to read about three emperors; Augustus, a brilliant and bright one but its his wife who ruled him and Rome in reality, Tiberius, a very clever opportunist but mistrustful and timid man, and last but not the least Claudius's nephew Caligula, a mad man in every sense.

Claudius did a wonderful job in describing these three and their reign in addition to politics, crucial events and effect royals killing each other in their quest for power.

A big portion of this book was dedicated to Germanicus, Claudius's brother. He was a great warrior and won numerous battles for Rome against Germany.

It was his bad luck that Tiberius was emperor than who put his trust in bad people and Germanicus suferred badly for this. It was sad to see his end.

While this book was full of shocks, deaths, betrayals, incest, assassinations, and political ambitions, it became dull in middle. Each chapter was very detailed but it also dragged but the book picked up again when Caligula became emperor.

His outrageous deeds brought back all the fun in the book. One of the character that I must mention here is Livia, wife of Augustus.

She was responsible for the deaths of half of royal clan and other half bowed to her for either they're too scared of her or because she was the only one who could have made their political dreams a reality.

But even with this fearsome image, she truly ruled the Rome when Augustus and Tiberius were emperor. She was the mastermind who ruled Rome and she did an amazing job of it.

All in all it was a great book on Rome, very informative. This is an apt read for those who love historical fiction. May 27, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , kindle-purchase , modern-classics.

In oh my, how time flies , Masterpiece Theater presented a BBC production of I, Claudius. The production included the events of both of Graves Claudius novels and featured a cast that would include some of the best actors of the century, among them Derek Jacobi, an unforgettable Claudius.

After watching it, I read Robert Graves novel from which its name was derived, but never got around to the second half of the story, Claudius the God.

Fast forward to today, and I am at last revisiting th In oh my, how time flies , Masterpiece Theater presented a BBC production of I, Claudius.

Fast forward to today, and I am at last revisiting the first novel in anticipation of reading the second. What an amazing piece of historical fiction this is!

I do not think bringing this era to life and making it relatable is easy, but Robert Graves makes it seem so.

What an unlikely hero is the stammering, crippled Claudius, but what a clear-sighted and good man he is, despite his times. How can you keep your sanity when there is so much arbitrary killing?

Was there ever a more villainous villain than Livia? A more reprehensible madman than Caligula? A less insightful dupe than Augustus?

No wonder Rome fell. At the end of this novel we have just been introduced to the lady, Messalina. I know what awaits me in volume two and I am looking forward to it.

Lord preserve us from ourselves. A work of historical fiction as it should be: entertaining but based on solid research, including accurate dates and places.

The book narrative is in the first-person, as if Claudius were writing his autobiography, complete with Homeric references and Latin vocabulary.

Tv Season Info. Derek Jacobi. Brian Blessed Augustus. James Faulkner. John Hurt. Patrick Stewart. Herbert Wise. Martin Lisemore.

Jack Pulman. There are no critic reviews yet for. Keep checking Rotten Tomatoes for updates! Jan 01, My father said, "The light at the end of the tunnel may be the express train that's headed in our direction.

We have problems and the situation is bad, but, hey, wait a bit, because things may soon get worse. The "I, Claudius" television series was one of the best in television history.

It prepared the English-speaking world for the s and the 21st century. Robert M. Nov 24, The show has strong performances and a large interesting cast, so it's production value is admittedly weak by today's standards.

Jason J. Mar 09, I would love to see the critics' review of this BBC series, although it has been a very long time since it first aired.

I am watching it perhaps for the 4th time This time it is because my son-in-law, who is an amazing student of history, wants our family vacation to be in Rome.

And we have booked a flat in the most historic part of Rome. And so voila. I am revisiting an old friend. The difference between way back then and now is that I can "google" the characters to get a more in-depth reading.

But ohmygosh Derek Jacobi is still amazing, as are all the other cast members. It's not like many BBC productions where the sets and production are SO amazing

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail